Tero Philosophy | Tero International, Inc.
Tero Logo

   Tero International, Inc.
     Your Elite Training Team

View Tero videos on You Tube Visit Tero International Blog Follow Tero on Twitter Become a Tero Fan on Facebook Follow Tero on LinkedIn
     Achieve. Lead. Outclass.

Tero Philosophy

The best way to understand Tero's training philosophy is to gain an understanding of how Tero approaches all training challenges.

Training must be Strategic

Training must be aligned with the company's strategic goals. Before launching any type of training program, Tero representatives meet with clients to gain a clear sense of the goals or desired outcomes for the training class.

Engaging and Educational

While good training should be engaging, at Tero, we also realize that there is a large difference between an activity for the sake of interactivity and an experience that facilitates learning. Activities that are only engaging and fun are entertainment - not training. All kinesthetic learning in Tero workshops is directly tied to a specific learning objective making it both engaging and educational.

Beyond Learning

Many trainers are delighted if their audience members walk away "having learned one good idea." At Tero we expect a great deal more and we believe learning cannot be the final goal. Simply knowing the information is not enough to compel someone to act on the information. If it were, the world would be a vastly different place. How many of us have learned something about the importance of exercise, a proper diet, and sufficient sleep, yet fail to implement what we know? Learning is important, but must be followed by a persuasive and compelling call to action.

Heavily Researched, Behavioral-based Curriculum

The goal of strategic, skill-building training is to produce meaningful, lasting behavior change in the participants who attend the sessions. Critical to success is a memorable training program, the product of excellent instructional design, which results in changing people's behavior. Tero understands the importance of excellent instructional design. For every one hour of class time, Tero invests an average of 50 - 60 hours in research, program design and curriculum development to translate the abundant and complex findings of research scientists into relevant, practical and fun training programs that make a real difference to the bottom line for its clients. This heavy focus on research not only guarantees that our training programs stand the test of time but also that the "flavor of the week training program" will not be found in Tero's portfolio of services.

Expert Delivery

Effective training programs are only part of the solution. Great content in the hands of a poor trainer does not produce desired results. Certified Tero facilitators, who themselves have received hundreds of hours of training and development to become skilled in the nuances of effective presentation skills, facilitation skills and experts in learning, lead Tero's state-of-the-art training programs.

Training is Not Always the Solution

It might seem unusual for a company whose survival is based entirely on revenue derived from training to declare that training isn't always the solution, but the fact is, it isn't. Tero believes that training is only the solution when people want to do things more effectively, are empowered to do so, but do not know how.

With many years of experience, Tero trainers have seen too many instances of training used as a quick fix. In these cases, the upfront strategic conversations pay large dividends, when what emerges is a situation that calls for a solution other than training. Tero is not willing to risk its credibility by recommending or accepting training assignments when training is not the solution.

Trainers Go Home

An in-house training department can check up on managers and participants from time to time and suggest corrective measure when necessary. Indeed, one of the liabilities of an external training company is that it isn't as easily available to follow up on the progress of the skills developed in training. However, the truth is that it is neither the in-house training department's job NOR the external training company's job to make sure skills are being used. Use of skills learned in training is ultimately and most appropriately the responsibility of the individuals who commissioned and participated in the training.

When Tero trainers go home it reinforces the responsibility that should always rest squarely on the shoulders of the participants and the people that contribute to the environment in which they work. For this reason, Tero's assumption is that good training should end. If a trainer does his/her job correctly, the client should arrive at a level of competency at which the trainer is no longer required. This is not to say that Tero conducts a training session and then sprints off into the night never to be heard from again. Tero trainers are available for refresher courses and/or questions. However, the intent is to leave at some point- leaving behind a group of newly trained people in an environment that will support and reinforce the skills they have learned.